Radio Communication with First Responders Pending at Lenape Tech

walkie talkie x100When we found this article we were so pleased, having sought for over one year for this, discovering it on this site was an exciting day for me.
Two-way radio communication at a local technical school would greatly improve school security, according to one local official.
Lenape Technical School Special Programs Coordinator Carla Thimons further explained the need for such during discussion on the Manor Township school’s $18,000 Pennsylvania Department of Education Safe School Initiative Competitive Targeted Grant award.
“These will truly help us feel better about safety overall, because communication is key,” Thimons said.
She said several programs at the technical school provide a unique challenge where areas of the building would not be able to listen to announcements over the public address system, and the Icom two way radios would provide necessary internal communication with teachers and staff.
Thimons said the grant funds were accepted by the Joint Operating Committee last month, and funding received, but the radios have not been purchased yet. She explained officials want to coordinate efforts with the Armstrong County Department of Public Safety to ensure that communication will be loud-and-clear.
“We want to determine the best purchase,” Thimons said. “We have an idea in mind what we want, but we want to coordinate with (the Department of Public Safety.)”
Radios are to be expected to be carried in the school hallways by officials by the start of the 2014-15 school year.
Thimons, who has been Special Programs Coordinator for 10 years and was previously the technical school’s principal, coordinates special education, grant writing and safety procedures at the school.
Besides the radios, Thimons said school officials are planning to hold school wide drills, including a mass-evacuation drill.
Joint Operating Committee members also unanimously approved the hire of Night Watchman Samantha Walker, retroactive to March 7.
Principal Karen Brock last month said the school used to have night watchmen, but another one needed to be hired to replace that individual.
Armstrong School District also received Safe School Initiative Competitive Targeted Grant funding in the amount of $25,000, and put the money toward the purchase of new and updated security cameras “as another layer of security throughout the district,” according to School Superintendent Stan Chapp in March.
Director of Technology and Information Services Anthony Grenda said about 16 surveillance cameras will be added to the interior and exterior of Elderton and Shannock Valley Elementary Schools. He hopes those cameras are installed by the end of the current school year. Several have already been installed, he said earlier this week.
Apollo-Ridge and Leechburg Area School Districts also received $25,000 in grant funds.
Earlier this year, Armstrong also received $40,000 in the state’s Safe Schools Grant Program for utilization of a school police officer. Those officers have also been already utilized throughout the district.
The Lenape Tech Joint Operating Committee meets again Thursday evening, beginning with a 6:30PM public budget session at the school.
Source – http://www.kittanningpaper.com/2014/04/16/radio-communication-with-first-responders-pending-at-lenape-tech/44954

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Walkie Talkie History & Info

2 way radio ukCan not get over how low-priced the two way radio headset with mic is now, a tremendous deal for any top-end product!

The fist radio audio transmitter and receiver that was coined with the name Walkie Talkie was created by Motorola. The group involved created the Motorola SCR-300 using frequency modulation. This first revision was actually backpack mounted.

Not long afterward, during World War 2, Motorola produced what was called a Handie Talkie which rather confusingly is what we would now recognize as a Walkie Talkie. It had massively reduced performance, but was the first completely self contained handheld device.

There are 2-way long range walkie talkie radios that will provide long distance rage communication. Many will go as far as 12 miles. The most commonly used walkie talkie devices are the ones that are hand held and contain a button on the side that you push to speak. They are great and come in very handy for many things. They are often used while camping, hiking, shopping, home projects, and even in businesses like construction.

These walkie talkie devices provide a clear, easily accessible way to talk to someone who is not close enough to speak to face to face. Many of the two-way radios have clips and other accessories like 2-way radio headsets so that the radio can clip to your pant and allow for easy and simple access to the radio.

The transmission range that the companies typically promote is up to 20 miles although according to the terrain you would be lucky to actually reach a 2 mile limit. Being trained previously in electronics and radio in particular I find walkie talkies to be only as effective as a line of sight signal. If you encounter a hill or mountain you can just about be assured that you will not be able to communicate at all.

The Crazy Days of Walkie Talkie

What would you know, this blog About keyword is definitely interesting, i hope you enjoy it

During the great citizen’s band or CB radio craze of the late 1970s, it seemed like everyone had to have a CB radio and talk like a truck drive while driving down the highway.

CB radio is an unlicensed local radio service for individuals and small businesses. CB radios are quite inexpensive and can be very handy.

As you might expect, filmmakers and entertainers use a fair amount of artistic license in their portrayal of CB activities. If you start off your CB career with unrealistic expectations, you’re bound to be disappointed so let’s begin with the basics. CB radio was created in the 1950s by the FCC in and effort to encourage citizen’s to use the new radio technology.

The CB service provides individuals and small businesses with a low-cost way to stay in touch and coordinate their day-to-day activities up to a 5 or 10 mile range. If this sounds like what you need, CB might be just what you’re looking for.

Many two-way radio services require you to purchase a license from the FCC. The CB radio service isn’t one of them. The FCC does have some rules that you should follow though. You can find the rules tucked into the operating manual of your radio. You can also download them on the Internet.

The rules are easy to read and are organized as a list of common questions. They include technical rules about radios and antennas as well as what you can and can’t do on the air.

What you can’t do is fairly straightforward and laid out clearly in CB rule 13. You can’t advertise materials for sale or a political campaign, cuss, play music, or rebroadcast radio or TV programming. You’re also forbidden to intentionally interfere with other stations and make false transmissions particularly distress calls.

Each CB 2 Way Radio can operate on any of 40 channels centered on frequencies from 26.965 to 27.405 MHz. This frequency range is near the upper limit of the traditional shortwave or HF band tucked in between the Amateur Radio 10-meter band and a band used by business radios.

You can operate in regular AM mode or select either upper or lower sideband a variation of AM discussed later in this chapter. That gives you 120 different choices about where to operate.

By far, the most popular use of CB radio today is in vehicles. Using CB for business-to-business communications is less common than it was in the halcyon days of CB radio but farms, towing companies, local delivery services, taxis, and other mobile users still find CB radios very useful.

Professional drivers use CB radio for everything from keeping an eye on speed traps to checking in at the delivery dock and making idle conversation with anyone in range. Right behind the professionals are private citizens who use CB radio when they drive for many of the same reasons.