Which Major Discoveries led to the Invention of the 2 way radio

Some of these expert writers on the net are at such a top level that i ponder if any of them have ever written a paperback? so sometimes i like to highlight these excellent content pieces and here is one i found remarkable the other day.

motorola 2 way radio xtniThe modern two-way radio, which is a direct descendent of the WW2-era Walkie Talkie, first became recognizable in the years just before the outbreak of World War 2. Its origins are an interesting story in their own right (but I’ll condense it here).

Three names are usually mentioned with regards to the invention of the walkie-talkie…

The first is Canadian inventor Donald Hings (1907 – 2004), who invented an early version of the technology back in 1937 (although it wasn’t widely acknowledged or used). Then, there’s American inventor Al Gross (1918 – 2000), who patented the name ‘walkie-talkie’ for his own invention a year later in ’38. Because of the ubiquity of the name, Gross became the best known ‘inventor’ of the technology at the time, even though it had technically existed for 12 months beforehand. However, this isn’t to detract from Gross’ claim, because his version of the walkie-talkie was actually quite different from Hings’ (despite operating on the same essential principles).

Then, there’s Dan Noble (1901 – 1980), a Motorola employee who, although he definitely did not invent the technology, certainly did lead the team that created the widely used WW2-era walkie-talkies. Hings’ version of the technology wasn’t used by the military until 1942, which led to Dan Noble being credited with the invention.

So, make of that mess what you will…

Now, to go back further (and get to the meat of your question), here is a list of discoveries that led to the creation of the two-way radio.

James Clark Maxwell (1831-1879), a mathematical physicist (and one of a seemingly endless line of genius Scotsmen) demonstrated that electromagnetic waves could propagate in free space in his 1865 paper ‘A Dynamical Theory of the Electromagnetic Field’ (of which the most famous fan was Albert Einstein). This led German physicist Heinrich Hertz (1857 – 1894) to build on Maxwell’s pioneering work by conclusively proving the existence of electromagnetic waves in 1887.

After that, Serbian-American inventor, physicist, vegetarian and absolute genius Nikola Tesla (1856 – 1943) demonstrated the transmission of radio frequency energy in 1892. After that, Italian inventor Guglielmo Marconi (1874 – 1937) built a wireless system capable of transmitting signals over unprecedented distances in 1895 – which is pretty much the birth of radio.

This was an important area of study at the time; the first wireless telephone conversation took place in 1880 and was made by Alexander Graham Bell (1847 – 1922), who was another Scot, incidentally. A lot of people were working on similar technology, so it would not have been unlike the ‘space race’ of the 50’s and 60’s at the time.

Marconi went about taking over pretty much all business related to the invention of the Walkie Talkie (which was, eventually, credited solely to him) and, by 1907, he had established the first commercial transatlantic radio service (and also pretty much screwed Tesla out of any/all royalties he would have been owed. Nice).

Thanks to the work of Julio Cervera Baviera (1854 – 1929) the Spanish army became the first to use radio for military purposes (at least, as far as I’m aware, anyway) in the early 1900’s.

Canadian inventor Reginald Fessenden (1866 – 1932) (who also helped to develop sonar and TV, incidentally), invented AM radio (no, not the ‘Breakfast Show’ –it means that more than one station can broadcast signals) when, on Christmas Eve 1906, he played some violin and read from the Bible.

Eventually, all ships were equipped with radio transmission capability, with Marconi owning a total monopoly over ship-to-shore communication. Ship-to-shore contact became a subject of increased awareness and importance following the Titanic disaster of 1912 and radios began to be seen even more as a crucial safety measure in all areas of industry as a result. Look up the 1913 ‘International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea’ (it has a Wikipedia page, I just checked) for more info.

Skipping forward a bit, now. Throughout the 1930’s, there were a ton of minor (and major) improvements made to the technology, more than a few made by Marconi and his engineers. Some really clever people made their mark on the fledgling technology here, but if I mention them all, we’ll never get to the end.

Oh, by the way, FM radio was subsequently invented by American electrical engineer Edwin Armstrong (1890 – 1954) in 1933.

By the late 30’s, Hings comes into the picture, as does the rising spectre of a terrifyingly advanced Nazi Germany. The race was on to have the best equipped armies out there fighting the Axis powers and the allies wisely put a huge amount of manpower into the development of portable radio communication. It was a decision which led directly to the rapid co-opting of Hings and Gross’ work, as well as the later improvements made by Noble.

This is a long and fascinating story (about which many books have been written), but, as a ‘potted history’ of sorts, I hope that answers your question.

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Is Motorola Solutions Destined for Greatness

communication devices low techThankyou for reading my site, here is a piece of writing i really loved reading. With their permission i’m able to repost it. I write tons of my own content, but irregularly repost other content i find remarkable, thankyou for reading.

Investors love stocks that consistently beat the Street without getting ahead of their fundamentals and risking a meltdown. The best stocks offer sustainable market-beating gains, with robust and improving financial metrics that support strong price growth. DoesMotorola Solutions (NYSE: MSI ) fit the bill? Let’s take a look at what its recent results tell us about its potential for future gains.
What we’re looking for The graphs you’re about to see tell Motorola’s story, and we’ll be grading the quality of that story in several ways:

Growth: Are profits, margins, and free cash flow all increasing?
Valuation: Is share price growing in line with earnings per share?
Opportunities: Is return on equity increasing while debt to equity declines?
Dividends: Are dividends consistently growing in a sustainable way?

How we got here and where we’re going

We first looked at Motorola last year, and it’s earned six out of nine possible passing grades in its second assessment, the same number it earned earlier. Free cash flow has fallen since last year, but the company’s dividend payouts have increased at a greater rate. These trends might indicate the loss of a passing grade or two next year if the company remains committed to dividend payouts despite declining free cash flow. Can Motorola improve its flagging revenue and turn around a weakened free cash flow position? Let’s dig a little deeper to see what Motorola might be up to for the coming year.

Over the past few quarters, Motorola has been struggling to push its revenue higher due to weakness in its government business, thanks in no small part to the U.S. sequester — the American government now accounts for about two-thirds of its overall revenues. My Foolish colleague Rich Smith points out that Motorola recently secured some smaller government contracts, despite unpleasant fiscal conditions in the U.S. The Department of Defense awarded the company a $16.9 million contract to offer land mobile motorola DP2600 walkie talkie support services in Kuwait.

However, this is not enough to move the needle — Motorola needs some billion-dollar contracts, or at least something in the nine figures. The problem is worse for Motorola than for fellow tech contractor Harris (NYSE: HRS ) , which seems to be picking up more government money to supply radios than its peer, in addition to its other telecommunications work. Motorola is almost entirely dependent on its radio sales today, and if Harris is outperforming it, there may not be much reason to expect growth ahead.

Fool contributor John Divine notes that Motorola’s enterprise solutions segment has also been quite slow to launch new products, which led to a substantial reduction in its full-year revenue forecast. According to Reuters, the release of Motorola’s Windows 8-based enterprise handhelds has been delayed until next year, which has weighed on the company’s enterprise segment. The launch of these new products should enable Motorola to win some of the deals that were deferred due to macroeconomic uncertainties this year, and that might finally improve its weak revenue position. Motorola’s RhoElements application framework is also expected to drive growth in enterprise-based applications, and its acquisition of Psionwill help it to expand globally and strengthen its mobile computing portfolio.

Motorola could also benefit from the increasing adoption of LTE mobile networks for public safety in the domestic and overseas markets. Last year, the government approved a payroll tax bill that allows the Federal Communications Commission to auction off TV spectrum for wireless services. The FCC later reallocated the D block spectrum for public safety purposes, which is right up Motorola’s radio-focused alley, provided it isn’t undermined by Harris or other contractors.

Putting the pieces together

Today, Motorola has some of the qualities that make up a great stock, but no stock is truly perfect. Digging deeper can help you uncover the answers you need to make a great buy — or to stay away from a stock that’s going nowhere.
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Source – http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2013/11/07/is-motorola-solutions-destined-for-greatness.aspx